Canada Day Maple Ribs

Koo loo koo koo, koo koo koo koooooo….

Good day eh and welcome to this, the Canada Day blog entry dedicated to every hoser known the world over!

We’ve been invited to our pals Gio & Michelle’s for a Canada Day barbecue and as good neighbours, I offered to bring along a few ribs to share with the occasional caesar and cold brew from back home.

The ribs are a take on the traditional and classic Big Green Asian Egg FFRs (Fred Flintstone Ribs) with a twist! Instead of using honey during the steeping stage, I’ve used good old, 100% Canadian Maple Syrup! The recipe and timing is identical to the FFRs and of course the ribs themselves come from our favorite provider of swine…the Pig Lady!

As a refresher, here are the steps:

Phase 1:

  • Get your ribs to room temperature – we had two racks totaling 2kg
  • Prepare your rib rub and coat each side of the rib slabs as well as in between the ribs (top and bottom)
  • Set your grill at 275 F with the plate setter in place for indirect cooking as well as a drip pan and rib rack.
  • Place the ribs on the rack for 2 hour
    
   Phase 2:
  • Place your ribs into individual aluminium foil packs or use a tin container like I did for both racks.
  • Coat the bottom of the container with brown sugar and then drizzle on a good helping of 100% pure maple syrup.
  • Put your ribs in the container, meat side down and then coast the tops of the ribs with brown sugar and maple syrup.
  • Pour in two cups of Apple cider, for today’s ribs I used 2009 vintage “Merrydown” medium cider (alc 7.5% vol per 750 ml)
  • Lastly, tightly wrap the top of the tin container with aluminium foil and make a steaming pocket for the next 1 hour and 40 minutes
    
  • Lower your temperature to about 200-225 F at this point – no need to kill the ribs with too much heat.
  • Remove your slabs from the container, and place them meat side up on the grid.  Slather your homemade KC sauce on once side of the slab and close the lid for 20 minutes.
  • Flip the ribs and coat the slab and close the lid for another 20 minutes.
  • At this point, the rib meat will be ready to fall off the bone.  Try to keep the racks intact and set them aside wrapped in foil to cool down.
  • When you’re ready to serve…slice them up with a sharp knife and you’re good to go!

    

Phase 4:
  • Head off to your pals’ place and enjoy the ribs!
  • Open a cold beer
  • Toast the Queen and the Prime Minister
Happy Canada Day!
Roman

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Overall Heather Rating: 10/10
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5 thoughts on “Canada Day Maple Ribs”

  1. I tried your Canadian style ribs some time ago and they were the best ribs I’ve been able to make with my BGE.
    I have a quick question which I hope you would be able to answer. I’m thinking about serving a big dinner some time from now to about 15-20 men / women but I know that I won’t be able to cook all of it in a single day so I’m thinking about cooking 10-15 ribs in the days prior to the dinner and putting them in the fridge. On the day of the dinner itself I will cook another 6-8 from scratch.
    My question is: what would you recommend to do when warming up ribs from the day prior? Given that the BGE has probably just finished off the previous batch indirectly at a temp of 200F, could I just throw them on and cook them for another 30 minutes or so to warm them up or should I use a different temperature / duration?

    Kind regards,

    Jeroen

    PS: thanks for sharing your recipes! I’ve had some great dinners with friends and family over your recipes and they’re very much appreciated.

    1. Hi Jeroen, thanks very much for writing in and for the compliment. I’m really pleased you’ve done well with this recipe too…it’s definitely one of my favourites!

      On the question….hmmmm….I thought long and hard about it. To reheat or not to reheat? Firstly, that’s a huge amount of ribs. Although they will be the star of the dinner, my question is, do you need that many? I like to give people a teaser of ribs so they beg for more! Try supplementing them with other quick goodies perhaps?

      What I’m getting a is that I’m not a fan of reheating the next day…not ribs at least. They’ll lose that moist and oozing characteristic and the fresh ones will win the taste test.

      What I’ve done in the past is once cooked and rested, I cut up the ribs and keep them in a large aluminium tray, covered with a double sheet of strong Ali foil then I wrap the tray(s) in a heavy towel and put them into an empty cooler. You’ll be surprised how long the’ll stay warm!

      Hope this helps, and do let us know how it went!
      Happy Ribbing!
      Roman

      1. Hi Roman,

        Thanks for the input. Since I’ve served your recipe before, most of my friends and family have grown accustomed to having a whole sparerib a person. (usually in a 4-6 person setting)
        Having 20 people over with 15 slabs of spareribs (the other 5 will probably be fish and vegiterrible), I’m pretty certain I won’t be able to handle 15 slabs in a single serving.
        I now see two options: either make a batch in the morning (have that run from 07:00 until 12:00) and wrap that up well in tinfoil and towels to keep in the heat hoping that they’ll last for 5-6 hours or borrow an Egg from either a colleague or work. (they were a Christmas gift of our company 🙂 (Best Christmas gift ever!))
        Again, thanks for the input, I’ll refrain from reheating them and will definitely have to try your pulled pork recipe these days.

        Kind regards,

        Jeroen

  2. Hi Roman,

    Served your ribs again this weekend for a party of 6.
    These are the results:
    https://twitter.com/i/#!/JMKleijer/media/slideshow?url=http%3A%2F%2Ftwitpic.com%2Fb1hlnz
    (Click left arrow to go forward in pics)
    Your recipe was very much appreciated by everyone.
    6 slabs of ribs really is the max. for a medium egg 🙂
    I’ll have to borrow one or two extra eggs from work come March when I’ll be serving to a party of 15-20 people…..

    Again, thanks for the recipe and keep ’em coming 🙂

    Kind regards,

    Jeroen Kleijer

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